Kicking the Cigarette Habit

Kicking the Cigarette Habit

While there are a number of stop-smoking products on the market (and increasing), the bulk of smokers do not use stop-smoking aids or organized programs when attempting to quit, as reported by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (Volume 28, Number 1). The rate reporting seeking assistance or smoking cessation aids ran around 22%, meaning that more than three quarters of all smokers go it alone when trying to stop smoking. This may due, in part, to the cost of cigarette stop smoking products/services and also to some of the problems noted with various stop smoking drugs like Chantix.

Some stop-smoking products and programs do work for some smokers, but many smokers find that dealing with nicotine addition is a private battle and prefer to quit on their own terms and in their own ways. For these individuals, a holistic approach tends to work best with some tapering down on smoking and others going cold turkey.

Smokers need to identify the needs filled by smoking and find substitute activities or coping skills for best success. For example, a smoker who uses cigarettes during stressful situations needs to identify stressors and also work on new ways to alleviate and deal with stress. Celebration smokers can brainstorm other “treats” that serve as rewards for life successes. Those who smoke to drop or maintain weight might focus on dietary changes to reduce the need to use cigarettes to maintain a smaller jean size. Social smokers may need to develop new interests and activities that restrict or limit smoking.

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